Read this this morning  a very well written piece....



   "When life is a misery, you give your patients something," my 100-year-old mother, Aileen Breslin, told me in December, as she lay in her hospital bed, suffering intolerable physical and mental pain.

 "Why can't you do the same for me?" She was absolutely right. When a life is no longer worth living, I bring that life to a painless end. I'm legally permitted to do because I'm a veterinarian - and the life I am ending is that of anything other than a human.

 But now, as of last week, if you live in Canada, as my mother did, and thanks to the Canadian Supreme Court's resounding 9-0 judgment, people in her circumstances will be allowed to ask their physicians to help end their misery too. I can't help wondering if we should have the same right elsewhere.

Let me give you a little background to the circumstances I found myself in two months ago. Mum was a warm, articulate, instinctively intelligent and exasperatingly wordy woman.

 We ended up living thousands of miles apart, Mum in Toronto, me in London. Our telephone conversations never lasted less than 45 minutes. "She should teach breath control at Rada," my actress wife Julia once said.

 Mum's phone calls were stream-of-consciousness monologues. Once her mouth left the runway, no one had a chance to interject. She was exasperating. She was a handful. Yet what she had to say was always lucid and sensible. "Bruce, are you telling your children you love them?" She never lost her exquisitely tuned emotional intelligence.

 My parents were married for 67 years. Dad, a man of natural majesty and few words, could make or repair anything. He built our family's summer cottage on Lake Chemong in Peterborough, Ontario, drilling the well, laying the foundation, hammering every length of lumber. My son, writer and broadcaster Ben Fogle, says it was his summers at the lake that introduced him to the joy of the outdoors.

 In the storm of emails from her nieces and nephews that filled my inbox in the last weeks of Mum's life, my cousins agreed on one fact. Aileen was born two generations too soon. Her father, my grandfather, was restless, moving Aileen and her nine older siblings from one small town to another in Ontario. Both he and her mother died while Aileen was in her teens, losses she never really came to terms with. Several of her brothers were studying at the University of Toronto at the time and, because she was young and a woman, they removed her from school to cook and care for them, something they later abundantly apologised for.

Then she met Dad in 1937. She couldn't face a marriage ceremony without parents, so they eloped in 1939, honeymooning in Ottawa. It took a lifetime of experience for her to come to terms with that relationship. In the last weeks of her life, when I asked if she had any regrets, she lucidly but - ever so sadly - told me: "I knew your father was a good man, but it needed him to die for me to understand what a good husband he was."

 The summer cottage Dad built provided my parents' extended family with food, fishing and above all laughter. Between them, my parents had 16 brothers and sisters, and all of them went forth and multiplied. At Mum's 100th birthday party last August, she had her family laughing and crying at the same time. Ben called his grandmother the Duracell Bunny.

 Back in 2012, Mum was up and walking a day after a fractured hip replacement when she was 98 years old. When she fell and fractured her other hip, last December, she had it replaced, but her body was too frail for any practical rehabilitation.

I spent each day with her in the hospital, reading her a memoir I'd just completed about the summer of 1954 at the cottage on Lake Chemong. Of course she was a central character in that memoir, so the stories I read to her were about a vivacious, sexy, bouncy young blonde.

 "I had forgotten how much freedom I gave you and Robert," she reminded me, when I read her a line about my brother and I being called to lunch from wherever we might be by her ringing a cow bell first on the dock, then at the back of the cottage.

 I questioned her doctors. "Surely a woman with that much energy can still be rehabilitated enough to get out of bed and into a wheelchair?" I queried. "I'm all used up." Mum interjected. "Can't you give me something?" Her doctors and nurses, all sympathetic, told her they would keep her comfortable. Weeks passed. Her pain was relentless.

 Three weeks after her hip replacement, as the old year reached its end, she told me she wanted to speak with me in confidence. "You won't give me anything so I have decided to stop eating and drinking. What do you think?"

 Mum was telling me she had decided to die. This time, she was only just ahead of her time. Thanks to that Canadian Supreme Court ruling, people in her circumstances will now be able to do so, painlessly, of their own free will, simply by asking for and taking pills, without putting themselves or their families through a needlessly protracted and inevitably uncomfortable end of life.

 But Mum did not have that luxury. Her only option was to refuse food.

 "Your mind is still more lucid than mine will ever be," I replied. "I don't want you to die but if you're asking my advice, I'd still drink."

 "What should I drink?" Mum asked.

"Whatever you like." I replied. "Water, tea, coffee."

 "Melissa's chicken soup?" she asked. Mel is her daughter-in-law.

 "Of course," I answered, "but if you do, you will live longer."

 Mum decided not to. I continued to read to her each day, giving her fluids when she was thirsty, and asked if there was anything she wanted me to say at her funeral.

 "I heard all my obituaries at my 100th birthday party," she replied, then added: "Yes. Be content with what you have." I jotted that down on the back of an airport coffee shop receipt.

 "Anything else?" I asked.

 "Don't let petty squabbles obstruct your relationships."

 "Anything else?"

 "Have more sex. Tender touch is what we all need."

 I winced a bit at that one. Parents never have sex, do they?

 "Anything else?"

 "Feel the grass under your bare feet. Listen to birdsong. Stop! Marvel at life!"

 She passed away a few days later. And that evening, I happened to listen to some classical music: Smetana's symphonic poem Die Moldau. In it, the Vltava River that flows through Prague cascades then eddies and swirls then slows to a serene flow. The tranquil and still end of Smetana's symphony concludes with two unexpected, energetic and powerfully uplifting beats. "That's Mum!" streaked through my mind. I bawled like a newborn.

 The end of her life should have been easier for her. And now I think how sad that the Canadian Supreme Court had not ruled as they have just done a year or more sooner. And should Britain not be following in Canada's footsteps? I think so - and without a doubt we will eventually.

I agree with Joanna Trollope, who said in an interview with The Daily Telegraph last week: "I would really hope by that stage the idea of assisted dying would have been debated and accepted to some degree. It's a logical thing but everyone's so terrified of being accused of murder that the medical profession has its hands tied."

 In her last days, I read Mum the opening lines of Richard Dawkins's Unweaving the Rainbow.

 "We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born... Certainly, those unborn ghosts include greater poets than Keats, scientists greater than Newton. We privileged few, who won the lottery of birth against all odds, how dare we whine at our inevitable return to that prior state from which the vast majority have never stirred?"

 Mum told me that is exactly how she felt, and I read those lines at her funeral.

 Bruce Fogle's Barefoot at the Lake: A Memoir of Summer People and Water Creatures is published in April. - Daily Telegraph UK By Bruce Fogle EmailPrint
I agree Jaffa and it is a very well written piece. Ben Fogle is well known on UK tv presenting wildlife and travel related programmes and his mother is a famous former actress, Julia Foster.
I to agree, thanks for sharing Jaffa  :D
thank you both
good to see you back Morton...
and thank you for that information Graham adds more understanding to the article,it was in our NZ Herald this morning..
Like reading the paper online with a cuppa.. 
Thanks Jaffa nice to know am missed   :lol:    but don't come on the site a lot, like I use to. 
Yet another well written piece

Up until few years ago I was very much in favour of the Physician Assisted Euthanasia. I saw the misery and I was a very strong advocate of Dr. Jack Kevorkian.

Broadcaster's motto is "Not all is as it seems" and over the last few years I have looked into this in much deeper way than what is being portrayed here.

  Assisted suicide is likely to accelerate the decline in quality of our health care system. A 1998 study from Georgetown University's Center for Clinical Bioethics underscores the link between profit—driven managed health care and assisted suicide.

The research found a strong link between cost—cutting pressure on physicians and their willingness to prescribe lethal drugs to patients, were it legal to do so. The study warns that there must be "a sobering degree of caution in legalizing [assisted suicide] in a medical care environment that is characterized by increasing pressure on physicians to control the cost of care" (Sulmasy et al., 1998).

 The deadly impact of legalizing assisted suicide would fall hardest on socially and economically disadvantaged people who have less access to medical resources and who already find themselves discriminated against by the health care system. As Paul Longmore, Professor of History at San Francisco State University and a foremost disability advocate on this subject, has stated, "Poor people, people of color, elderly people, people with chronic or progressive conditions or disabilities, and anyone who is, in fact, terminally ill will find themselves at serious risk" (Longmore, 1999).

Rex Greene, M.D., Medical Director of the Dorothy E. Schneider Cancer Center at Mills Health Center in San Mateo, California and a leader in bioethics, health policy and oncology, underscored the heightened danger to the poor. He said, "The most powerful predictor of ill health is [people's] income. [Legalization of assisted suicide] plays right into the hands of managed care."2 Supporters of assisted suicide frequently say that HMOs will not use this procedure as a way to deal with costly patients.

 They cite a 1998 study in the New England Journal of Medicine that estimated the savings of allowing people to die before their last month of life at $627 million. Supporters argue that this is a mere .07% of the nation's total annual health care costs.

But significant problems in this study make it an unsuitable basis for claims about assisted suicide's potential impact. The researchers based their findings on the average cost to Medicare of patients with only four weeks or less to live. Yet assisted suicide proposals (as well as the law in Oregon) define terminal illness as having six months to live. The researchers also assumed that about 2.7% of the total number of people who die in the U.S. would opt for assisted suicide, based on reported assisted suicide and euthanasia deaths in the Netherlands.

But the failure of large numbers of Dutch physicians to report such deaths casts considerable doubt on this estimate. And how can one compare the U.S. to a country that has universal health care?

 Taken together, these factors would skew the costs much higher (Rowen, 1999). • Fear, bias, and prejudice against disability. Fear, bias, and prejudice against disability play a significant role in assisted suicide. Who ends up using assisted suicide?

Supporters advocate its legalization by arguing that it would relieve untreated pain and discomfort at the end of life. But all but one of the people in Oregon who were reported to have used that state's assisted suicide law during its first year wanted suicide not because of pain, but for fear of losing functional ability, autonomy, or control of bodily functions (Oregon Health Division, 1999).

 Oregon's subsequent reports have documented similar results. Furthermore, in the Netherlands, more than half the physicians surveyed say the main reason given by patients for seeking death is "loss of dignity" (Birchard, 1999). This fear of disability typically underlies assisted suicide. Said one assisted suicide advocate, "Pain is not the main reason we want to die. It's the indignity. It's the inability to get out of bed or get onto the toilet ... [People] ... say, ‘I can't stand my mother – my husband – wiping my behind.' It's about dignity" (Leiby, 1996).

But as many thousands of people with disabilities who rely on personal assistance have learned, needing help is not undignified, and death is not better than reliance on assistance. Have we gotten to the point that we will abet suicides because people need help using the toilet? Diane Coleman, President and Founder of Not Dead Yet, a grassroots disability organization opposed to legalizing assisted suicide, has written that the "public image of severe disability as a fate worse than death … become(s) grounds for carving out a deadly exception to longstanding laws and public policies about suicide intervention services … Legalizing assisted suicide means that some people who say they want to die will receive suicide intervention, while others will receive suicide assistance. The difference between these two groups of people will be their health or disability status, leading to a two-tiered system that results in death to the socially devalued group" (Coleman, 2002).
Thanks BC the your informative post.It's good to hear all sides of this often highly emotive topic. I have a couple of questions

Firstly I am puzzled to why they feel large numbers of Dutch physicians fail to report assisted suicide and euthanasia deaths if it is now legal for them to do this, it doesn't make sense.

The other question is, do you feel that it depends on the type of health system a country has to how this might be open for abuse.Here ours is relatively free,even so your point is well taken on health boards maybe using it to economise,we can request a " Do not resuscitate" and have a living will, but it is still illegal to assist with a death.By society having this debate and looking that all the aspects and dangers that could arise from a passing for this sort of legislation, hopefully it will limit  the chances of abuse by family or govt budgeting. 

There are many different circumstances to why someone would want to make this decision
The debate I suppose is should we (or our family) have the rights over our own body even in death? 

 It reminds me of the time I was pregnant in Australia with my first child and wasn't allowed to know the gender of my baby, the reason? Because I might run off and abort if if it was the wrong gender.Today of cause we don't even think about the right for parents to choose if they would like this information or not.  
There is never a free lunch. Even if the health is free at the end it costs government money

where there is a cost there is always a tendency for cuts and savings

lets take the human aspect and pain aspect out
If a dog has been run over by a car and there is two ways of dealing with its outcome
Outcome one Rich owner save dog at any cost
outcome 2 Poor owner put it to sleep and get another dog
Once the flood gate is open the branches start shooting out
Any way I am the wrong guy for this discussion. I used to be pro euthanasia  but like I say in the post I am now against it
I am Pro life now so it is pointless trying to change my mind and for those who are for abortion also I suggest you read the founders views how her main aim is to get rid of black population . Another discussion another time.

Like I say nothing is what they seem to be. I have come to realize that on the whole most apparent worthy causes have a sinister background and motive to them. Starting with abolition of Slavery to abolition of Monarchy, to abolition of prohibition, to political correctness I can show with backing of research all the sinister plots behind the cause.

Any way I am done    
Broadcaster wrote: There is never a free lunch. Even if the health is free at the end it costs government money

where there is a cost there is always a tendency for cuts and savings

lets take the human aspect and pain aspect out
If a dog has been run over by a car and there is two ways of dealing with its outcome
Outcome one Rich owner save dog at any cost
outcome 2 Poor owner put it to sleep and get another dog
Once the flood gate is open the branches start shooting out
Any way I am the wrong guy for this discussion. I used to be pro euthanasia but like I say in the post I am now against it
I am Pro life now so it is pointless trying to change my mind and for those who are for abortion also I suggest you read the founders views how her main aim is to get rid of black population . Another discussion another time.

Like I say nothing is what they seem to be. I have come to realize that on the whole most apparent worthy causes have a sinister background and motive to them. Starting with abolition of Slavery to abolition of Monarchy, to abolition of prohibition, to political correctness I can show with backing of research all the sinister plots behind the cause.

Any way I am done
Broadcaster wrote: There is never a free lunch. Even if the health is free at the end it costs government money

where there is a cost there is always a tendency for cuts and savings

lets take the human aspect and pain aspect out
If a dog has been run over by a car and there is two ways of dealing with its outcome
Outcome one Rich owner save dog at any cost
outcome 2 Poor owner put it to sleep and get another dog
Once the flood gate is open the branches start shooting out
Any way I am the wrong guy for this discussion. I used to be pro euthanasia but like I say in the post I am now against it
I am Pro life now so it is pointless trying to change my mind and for those who are for abortion also I suggest you read the founders views how her main aim is to get rid of black population . Another discussion another time.

Like I say nothing is what they seem to be. I have come to realize that on the whole most apparent worthy causes have a sinister background and motive to them. Starting with abolition of Slavery to abolition of Monarchy, to abolition of prohibition, to political correctness I can show with backing of research all the sinister plots behind the cause.

Any way I am done
jaffa33 wrote: Thanks BC the your informative post.It's good to hear all sides of this often highly emotive topic. I have a couple of questions

Firstly I am puzzled to why they feel large numbers of Dutch physicians fail to report assisted suicide and euthanasia deaths if it is now legal for them to do this, it doesn't make sense.

The other question is, do you feel that it depends on the type of health system a country has to how this might be open for abuse.Here ours is relatively free,even so your point is well taken on health boards maybe using it to economise,we can request a " Do not resuscitate" and have a living will, but it is still illegal to assist with a death.By society having this debate and looking that all the aspects and dangers that could arise from a passing for this sort of legislation, hopefully it will limit the chances of abuse by family or govt budgeting.

There are many different circumstances to why someone would want to make this decision
The debate I suppose is should we (or our family) have the rights over our own body even in death?

It reminds me of the time I was pregnant in Australia with my first child and wasn't allowed to know the gender of my baby, the reason? Because I might run off and abort if if it was the wrong gender.Today of cause we don't even think about the right for parents to choose if they would like this information or not.
jaffa33 wrote: Read this this morning  a very well written piece....



   "When life is a misery, you give your patients something," my 100-year-old mother, Aileen Breslin, told me in December, as she lay in her hospital bed, suffering intolerable physical and mental pain.

 "Why can't you do the same for me?" She was absolutely right. When a life is no longer worth living, I bring that life to a painless end. I'm legally permitted to do because I'm a veterinarian - and the life I am ending is that of anything other than a human.

 But now, as of last week, if you live in Canada, as my mother did, and thanks to the Canadian Supreme Court's resounding 9-0 judgment, people in her circumstances will be allowed to ask their physicians to help end their misery too. I can't help wondering if we should have the same right elsewhere.

Let me give you a little background to the circumstances I found myself in two months ago. Mum was a warm, articulate, instinctively intelligent and exasperatingly wordy woman.

 We ended up living thousands of miles apart, Mum in Toronto, me in London. Our telephone conversations never lasted less than 45 minutes. "She should teach breath control at Rada," my actress wife Julia once said.

 Mum's phone calls were stream-of-consciousness monologues. Once her mouth left the runway, no one had a chance to interject. She was exasperating. She was a handful. Yet what she had to say was always lucid and sensible. "Bruce, are you telling your children you love them?" She never lost her exquisitely tuned emotional intelligence.

 My parents were married for 67 years. Dad, a man of natural majesty and few words, could make or repair anything. He built our family's summer cottage on Lake Chemong in Peterborough, Ontario, drilling the well, laying the foundation, hammering every length of lumber. My son, writer and broadcaster Ben Fogle, says it was his summers at the lake that introduced him to the joy of the outdoors.

 In the storm of emails from her nieces and nephews that filled my inbox in the last weeks of Mum's life, my cousins agreed on one fact. Aileen was born two generations too soon. Her father, my grandfather, was restless, moving Aileen and her nine older siblings from one small town to another in Ontario. Both he and her mother died while Aileen was in her teens, losses she never really came to terms with. Several of her brothers were studying at the University of Toronto at the time and, because she was young and a woman, they removed her from school to cook and care for them, something they later abundantly apologised for.

Then she met Dad in 1937. She couldn't face a marriage ceremony without parents, so they eloped in 1939, honeymooning in Ottawa. It took a lifetime of experience for her to come to terms with that relationship. In the last weeks of her life, when I asked if she had any regrets, she lucidly but - ever so sadly - told me: "I knew your father was a good man, but it needed him to die for me to understand what a good husband he was."

 The summer cottage Dad built provided my parents' extended family with food, fishing and above all laughter. Between them, my parents had 16 brothers and sisters, and all of them went forth and multiplied. At Mum's 100th birthday party last August, she had her family laughing and crying at the same time. Ben called his grandmother the Duracell Bunny.

 Back in 2012, Mum was up and walking a day after a fractured hip replacement when she was 98 years old. When she fell and fractured her other hip, last December, she had it replaced, but her body was too frail for any practical rehabilitation.

I spent each day with her in the hospital, reading her a memoir I'd just completed about the summer of 1954 at the cottage on Lake Chemong. Of course she was a central character in that memoir, so the stories I read to her were about a vivacious, sexy, bouncy young blonde.

 "I had forgotten how much freedom I gave you and Robert," she reminded me, when I read her a line about my brother and I being called to lunch from wherever we might be by her ringing a cow bell first on the dock, then at the back of the cottage.

 I questioned her doctors. "Surely a woman with that much energy can still be rehabilitated enough to get out of bed and into a wheelchair?" I queried. "I'm all used up." Mum interjected. "Can't you give me something?" Her doctors and nurses, all sympathetic, told her they would keep her comfortable. Weeks passed. Her pain was relentless.

 Three weeks after her hip replacement, as the old year reached its end, she told me she wanted to speak with me in confidence. "You won't give me anything so I have decided to stop eating and drinking. What do you think?"

 Mum was telling me she had decided to die. This time, she was only just ahead of her time. Thanks to that Canadian Supreme Court ruling, people in her circumstances will now be able to do so, painlessly, of their own free will, simply by asking for and taking pills, without putting themselves or their families through a needlessly protracted and inevitably uncomfortable end of life.

 But Mum did not have that luxury. Her only option was to refuse food.

 "Your mind is still more lucid than mine will ever be," I replied. "I don't want you to die but if you're asking my advice, I'd still drink."

 "What should I drink?" Mum asked.

"Whatever you like." I replied. "Water, tea, coffee."

 "Melissa's chicken soup?" she asked. Mel is her daughter-in-law.

 "Of course," I answered, "but if you do, you will live longer."

 Mum decided not to. I continued to read to her each day, giving her fluids when she was thirsty, and asked if there was anything she wanted me to say at her funeral.

 "I heard all my obituaries at my 100th birthday party," she replied, then added: "Yes. Be content with what you have." I jotted that down on the back of an airport coffee shop receipt.

 "Anything else?" I asked.

 "Don't let petty squabbles obstruct your relationships."

 "Anything else?"

 "Have more sex. Tender touch is what we all need."

 I winced a bit at that one. Parents never have sex, do they?

 "Anything else?"

 "Feel the grass under your bare feet. Listen to birdsong. Stop! Marvel at life!"

 She passed away a few days later. And that evening, I happened to listen to some classical music: Smetana's symphonic poem Die Moldau. In it, the Vltava River that flows through Prague cascades then eddies and swirls then slows to a serene flow. The tranquil and still end of Smetana's symphony concludes with two unexpected, energetic and powerfully uplifting beats. "That's Mum!" streaked through my mind. I bawled like a newborn.

 The end of her life should have been easier for her. And now I think how sad that the Canadian Supreme Court had not ruled as they have just done a year or more sooner. And should Britain not be following in Canada's footsteps? I think so - and without a doubt we will eventually.

I agree with Joanna Trollope, who said in an interview with The Daily Telegraph last week: "I would really hope by that stage the idea of assisted dying would have been debated and accepted to some degree. It's a logical thing but everyone's so terrified of being accused of murder that the medical profession has its hands tied."

 In her last days, I read Mum the opening lines of Richard Dawkins's Unweaving the Rainbow.

 "We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born... Certainly, those unborn ghosts include greater poets than Keats, scientists greater than Newton. We privileged few, who won the lottery of birth against all odds, how dare we whine at our inevitable return to that prior state from which the vast majority have never stirred?"

 Mum told me that is exactly how she felt, and I read those lines at her funeral.

 Bruce Fogle's Barefoot at the Lake: A Memoir of Summer People and Water Creatures is published in April. - Daily Telegraph UK By Bruce Fogle EmailPrint

\Never done this before but Bruce Fogal's text brought back memories of two years ago when my mother starved herself to death. She was 94 and my dad died twenty years ago she still missed him, and wanted to be with him, so she stopped eating . So when the doctor asked me if lwanted  her revived if she had a heart attack . l told him no and gave my mother the best gift l ever could the chance for her to be with my dad, who she said was waiting for her. She died twenty minits after l left her finally at peace..l will never regret that action. 
lynng21
My heart goes out to you and you are brave to post about this,it took a few days before I responded to you as what I'm about to say isn't nice...
and..
wonder whether I should tell this one story...
so here goes ..
When I was working in a aged care hospital in the evenings when my boys were little and my husband was working days, to bring in a little extra money, I was told by other long term workers of a process this hospital did.
In the case like  your mother,this  happened.,if the number of patients were low ,they would force feed them by putting and IV into the middle of their back were they couldn't pull it out, to keep them alive.. .
Thus continue getting funding...
So this is the other side of the debate in the abuse that broadcaster has pointed out.  
wow JAFFA,, my heart goes out to you.....soo totally.....i am saddened by your mum's situation,, but realize that we,, also,,one day,, will be in the exact spot. my uncle at a very young age pled with us to pull the plug.. i could not. who am i to make that decision. hopefuly we are all humanitarians and hopefully we have compassion. i totally respect one's decision to leave this world and will adhere to their wishes now,, i have seen the pain and suffering they endured...my last husband knew he was dieing and seriously made the best of it till he passed which was very hard to accept..the lesson here,, in my heart,,,is to RESPECT and carry out one's wishes whatever they might be,, it is their last wish and we really don't know what they are going thru, but,,, they know what we are going thru because their whole life is right there in front of them and hopefully they put that in perspective,, ergo,,,what would they do ? you are a special lady JAFFA..
Sylvia
Oh Jaffa, that seems so totally wrong. Keeping someone alive against their wishes when they are so ill is bad enough, but an IV in their back? It's unbelievable, it must be very uncomfortable too, especially in your last days when so many people lose a lot of their body weight. All in the name of money, what is wrong with people? It must have been so hard for you to live with. I really don't know what else to say.....
It is not enough, in most jurisdictions, to have a living will stating your wishes in an end of life scenario. I can only speak to the Province of Ontario, however it would be well to research the requirements in your own jurisdiction. Here you must have a notarized government issued document that is signed by yourself, two witnesses AND your personal licenced medical doctor. If this document is not present, any first responder is legally required to administer CPR and provide life saving care.

The unfortunate side bar, is that even with a Do Not Resuscitate order in place, it can be overturned by a court order or even a relative who does not agree, (son, daughter or spouse), at the last moment. This is an issue that needs to be discussed, as uncomfortable or distressing as it may be.

Most nursing homes have waiting lists for available beds. Depending on the laws where they operate, they may be forced to provide nutrients, as opposed to keeping patients alive. Not that I would deny this can happen, especially if it's a very expensive operation, with few patients.
Because nothing is cut and dried when I can no longer take the pain I will make a big mess with my shot gun and I don't care who has to clean the mess. I will be out of pain and isn't that the object. A friend used two 26ers of whiskey and a hand full of pills, another used his hunting rifle. Another just drove off the road at very high speed. Another locked himself in his garage with a running car. Most here use a rifle. This is country, we all have one. What we don't have is the right to decision. Who cares if it is against the law. It will be too late.
Well this is another thread that I would like to respond to with my something of my own.  My daughter passed from breast cancer 4 months ago but over the 2 years of her fight for life we went through many ups and downs.  I had suspected that it had entered the bones and when she got that diagnosis from the doctor an arrangement was made for him to assist her in her passing.  She told me about it and I was in full agreement.  Over the months that were ahead I watched her slow decline and wondered when she was going to know it was the "right" time as she called it.  One day in extreme pain she said to me "I am not afraid to die, I am just holding on for them"....she was looking at her 4 children.  She put up with incredible pain for her family and as her mother was there care giving with a heavy heart and trapped in the middle of wanting my daughter free and out of this and yet knowing my grandchildren would be lost without her.  Many things went through my mind over and over.  She did not want me there when she chose this.  I was to stay with the children.  That is reasonable and once again felt her choice was wise and yet with it all I wondered how I would be watching her leave for the last time.  How would it be explained to the children and how would they be?  In the end it never came to that.  Her husband took her out to get some fresh air and she said take me to the hospital.  She had pneumonia.  The first day I went in to see her she was sitting up in bed.  But the decline came fast.  Her hubby stayed at the hospital over night and then called me to come in.  He said not to bring the children.  When I got there my beautiful daughter was close to death.  Before I left the house I felt I was going to say my good-byes to her and that is exactly what I ended up doing.  Before I left I told her how much I loved her and she told me back that she loved me more.  We said that twice to each other and I kissed her forehead for the last time.  Three hours later her hubby phoned in fits of tears...she had gone.  I was the one that had to break the news to my grand kids.  And the end was similar to how I thought it would be if it had gone the way she had planned.  I do agree with assisted dying....I do believe no one should suffer ....that we should have the dignity to chose.  First hand experience of seeing the suffering should change anyone's mind if they are against it.  So well done Canada...it's about time...just meet in parliament and get it all in writing now....thanks for reading....Fern
cron