I left my I.T. career three years and didn't look back, i had a small restoration business that i ran on the side and decided to make it a viable business, only recently i have been contemplating getting into a total different field, only question am i too old to be looking at a new field of study. Anyone have a similar dilemma.
I have done the same thing you are considering. But I was forced to make a change. I fought each step of the way. I wanted to be safe, calm, and to tend the garden I knew. But after a few weeks of doubt and a lot of what ifs, I turned my attention to a path I had not really considered before. Will I tell you its easy, without strife, and I made no mistakes. No. It wasnt easy, and I made many mistakes. But the rewards of finding something I was a natural at, and succeeding, that in itself made up for everything else. It gave me the courage to find a path that I changed and fine tooled to make it my path, my life. I now have learned, that we are able to change, to look at the unknown, and to know we can conquer anything we truly put our faith and mind too.
Bottom line, if it is a passion, if it stirs your heart...take the step ..age doesnt matter.
Laurie
Been one of my greatest challenges, spent a lot of time in my career planning and anticipating the outcome of actions, so to deviate from whats comfortable to the unknown has been tough. I have a number of paths that i am looking at can't say they are my passion but i definately find them intriguing. Thanks for the advice always good to know others have had the same challenges and discovered soemthing new and exciting.
Changing career,,, the time somebody is going to be retired in his first job/career is already far behind us. Larger companies don't last long, merging, splitting-up, new shareholders, numerous things can happen with companies, which gives us reason or challenge to change job or career.The job market is on a steady movement, keeping up with this evolution is also a challenge for your own career. You can try to plan your career, but most of the time other sources are involved in the direction of your career.
The question is, do you want to go with the flow, keeping perhaps a secured job or career, or are you looking for new challenges, how ambitious are you.
Personally, I had several changes in my career; once my job didn't give any satisfaction any more, or improvement was not possible, I was looking for en new challenge. At 50, I started a total new business, related to my former careers and experiences.
You only can do this if you have enough energy and you feel yourself happy with your choices.   
At the age of retirement, I sold my company and started as a R&D Manager, Consultant and trouble shooter for several companies. Only the sky is the limit.
Paul__ wrote: I left my I.T. career three years and didn't look back, i had a small restoration business that i ran on the side and decided to make it a viable business, only recently i have been contemplating getting into a total different field, only question am i too old to be looking at a new field of study. Anyone have a similar dilemma.

Hi Paul

I wouldn't call my situation a dilemma. I took a corporate buy-out way back in '96 and started my own company. After several years of reasonable success I wanted to get much more focussed so I ended up doing a Master's Degree in a city about 250 km from where I lived. By the way, I was 52 when I started and 55 when I finished. It wasn't an easy couple of years, even though we only went down 1 weekend/month. My business sure took a financial hit because I wasn't able to attend to it like I had previously. But I had anticipated that so didn't worry a whole lot about it.

The odd thing was that by the time I'd finished the degree I'd also concluded that it wasn't a discipline I wanted to practice in. Yet out of the experience I ended up creating the work that has become my life's work for over a decade now. Oddly enough that is working primarily as a life transition coach! My own experiences of changing careers several times and of doing it as an entrepreneur as well as a corporate employee brings a lot of real-life expertise to the conversations with my clients.

Please don't think I'm trolling for business here. I'm not. I'd just encourage you to keep with it. One question I'd ask is this: is the new field of study you are considering one that is highly regulated? If so, you may find that there are hidden barriers to an older 'newbie' being accepted. But, in general, I've found that most barriers are those we create in our own mind rather than being 'out there'. Even in the field of medicine where it was unheard of for middle aged people to train as doctors a couple of decades ago, it is now common to find people in their 50's as newly minted MDs.

As another poster commented: is it easy? Heck no. But I always like to point out to people that the discomfort or outright misery of their current situations aren't easy either. I've always found that when I know my discomfort is coming out my efforts to improve my life, it certainly becomes much more bearable.

Good luck to you, whatever you choose.

ps One other caution I typically have for my 'late life' clients is this: is whatever you are choosing as a late life career change big enough, juicy enough for you? I've just finished working with a woman, for example, who happily left a corporate position, bought a franchise and started her own window coverings business. But after a few years the glow wore off and she found that there simply wasn't enough challenge and intellectual stimulation in her chosen line of business. So she sold up and is currently crafting an entirely new profession for herself in her mid 50's
I wanted to do something after retiring, so I became a dog walker.  It is very rewarding.  It helps me as well because I want the exercise.  Another bonus is that I love animals.

It has escalated now.  Much to my advantage, I am now a dog walker/house or condo sitter.  I take advantage of two week jobs quickly because to be in one of those big mansions or 5 million dollar condos with a couple cute doggies is like being on vacation and the pay is good to boot!

I hope I can do it until I am 100 years old! :lol: :lol:  
Good for you Jessy, I've just started setting up as a dog minder, albeit in my own home, and dog trainer, it's an ideal job for someone who loves animals, it sounds like you really enjoy it. All the best.
latebloomer wrote:
Paul__ wrote: I left my I.T. career three years and didn't look back, i had a small restoration business that i ran on the side and decided to make it a viable business, only recently i have been contemplating getting into a total different field, only question am i too old to be looking at a new field of study. Anyone have a similar dilemma.

Hi Paul

I wouldn't call my situation a dilemma. I took a corporate buy-out way back in '96 and started my own company. After several years of reasonable success I wanted to get much more focussed so I ended up doing a Master's Degree in a city about 250 km from where I lived. By the way, I was 52 when I started and 55 when I finished. It wasn't an easy couple of years, even though we only went down 1 weekend/month. My business sure took a financial hit because I wasn't able to attend to it like I had previously. But I had anticipated that so didn't worry a whole lot about it.

The odd thing was that by the time I'd finished the degree I'd also concluded that it wasn't a discipline I wanted to practice in. Yet out of the experience I ended up creating the work that has become my life's work for over a decade now. Oddly enough that is working primarily as a life transition coach! My own experiences of changing careers several times and of doing it as an entrepreneur as well as a corporate employee brings a lot of real-life expertise to the conversations with my clients.

Please don't think I'm trolling for business here. I'm not. I'd just encourage you to keep with it. One question I'd ask is this: is the new field of study you are considering one that is highly regulated? If so, you may find that there are hidden barriers to an older 'newbie' being accepted. But, in general, I've found that most barriers are those we create in our own mind rather than being 'out there'. Even in the field of medicine where it was unheard of for middle aged people to train as doctors a couple of decades ago, it is now common to find people in their 50's as newly minted MDs.

As another poster commented: is it easy? Heck no. But I always like to point out to people that the discomfort or outright misery of their current situations aren't easy either. I've always found that when I know my discomfort is coming out my efforts to improve my life, it certainly becomes much more bearable.

Good luck to you, whatever you choose.

ps One other caution I typically have for my 'late life' clients is this: is whatever you are choosing as a late life career change big enough, juicy enough for you? I've just finished working with a woman, for example, who happily left a corporate position, bought a franchise and started her own window coverings business. But after a few years the glow wore off and she found that there simply wasn't enough challenge and intellectual stimulation in her chosen line of business. So she sold up and is currently crafting an entirely new profession for herself in her mid 50's


With pleasure I be reading this post. I returned with 62 back to my home country Germany from the USA. After everyone told me I am,to old to find a job I did find employment in a city i didn´t like to go. Will retire finally next year with 66 and prepare in teh meantime for another career in retirement as a motivational speaker and coach. Age is only a number and I admire anyone who doesn´t care what others say or think. Do what you love to do and you will succeed.
Paul__ wrote: I left my I.T. career three years and didn't look back, i had a small restoration business that i ran on the side and decided to make it a viable business, only recently i have been contemplating getting into a total different field, only question am i too old to be looking at a new field of study. Anyone have a similar dilemma.

You are never too old, what happens if u live to be a 100 yrs old, that is 50yrs of another career!!
My step father worked at a transport company way back when. I used to go with him on a run sometimes as a teenager and thought this is what I wanted to do. It didn't happen as kids came along, and after many years I took the plunge and went for my AZ license at the age of 56. Love the travelling and would recommend the TIOW courses thru the unemployment offices as a way of getting into a new line of work. They paid for the course, my airbrakes course and even my workboots. Awesome program.
I changed my career at 50 when I moved to a small town with very few opportunities. You do what you gotta do.
Hello there everyone. This is my first post. I am 58 and just started a new career when I moved from the city back to my small home town with few job opportunities. For the past 16 year I worked in a city as a mental health outreach worker, and now, low and behold, I find myself working as an employment counsellor. Working in the community as an outreach worker was a dream job and my dog was able to come to work with me. Now, I am in an office all day helping people find their own dream jobs, or help then in many other ways. Life never stops changing.
I have been a full-charge bookkeeper for over 55 years and for the last 12 years I was a realtor. After a sudden divorce blew me away, I quit real estate in favor of an online job. I had to do a ton of research to find a job that was REAL and not a scam. Actually I found two online jobs and am working to get started. I am now 70 years old so I was 58 when I became a realtor. No sweat. It doesn't matter how old you are but whether you have the determination to make such a drastic change. I certainly did and my ex now realizes who did all of the work in real estate and he misses me! Now my online jobs are putting advertisements on web pages for Fortune 500 companies and the second one is a writing job. I take assignments that are available and make anywhere from $50 to $400 a piece depending on length required and subject matter. There is often some research involved and that happens to be a passion of mine. By working online I get to work at home when I want to. The more I work, the more I earn. I can sit at home in my pj's and I don't have to commute, buy gasoline, clothes, throw the alarm clock across the room or go to bed early any more. I can work at the beach, on the bus or anywhere I am. It is heavenly. BUT you have to be somewhat organized in order to get assignments done on time. Set up a small office at home and go for it. I love it!
cron